IT CAN BE FUN!

This weekend I will be at an Autumn Arts Bazaar promoting my Mrs. Claus book.  Although this is not my favorite part of the writing process, I know it can be fun. I just have to follow my own advice that I tell myself or my class about get the writing done.  Just show up and have fun.

The possibilities are endless if I just show up and smile. I am not trying to impress anyone.

Having no expectations and being open to whatever happens makes this a win -win for me.

My husband follows the same philosophy. He doesn’t put a lot of thought  having into a good or bad day and he usually comes away having really good days when many would only see the negative. It’s all about attitude.

I get to share Mrs. Claus,  a book I enjoyed writing, and a book that is illustrated by a talented artist who spread the humor of my story of Mrs. Claus in a very effective way.

Imposter syndrome can affect us all if we let it. But the truth is if we write, we are writers.

And If I love what I do then why not share it?   The Edison Autumn Makers’ Fair is a  community event that supports    Edison High School where my son went to  high school. I will be among other creative people.

Giving back to my community while having fun and maybe even selling a couple of books makes it all worth it.

 

Oh and by the way, check out these freebies on my blog site and have some fun putting together gift boxes you can fill with treats for your loved ones!  HO! HO! HO!

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Writing Matters But So Does Lunch

 

 

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It is June and that means graduation season for many of us including me. This week my 18 year old son, Dylan, is graduating from high school.

And until today, I have been making his lunch.

I am not sure why I kept doing it.  Teachers used to tease him about. But he didn’t mind. It was really more for me than him.

I told myself that I had to make my own lunch and it wasn’t a big deal. And that it was one less thing he would have to do knowing there were finals and presentations to finish. He’d rather sleep anyway then worry about making a lunch. 

As I put together the photos for his Open House, I wondered how the years flew away from me and how he grew from a boy to a 6’ 5” man he is today. Lately, I have been calling him Shaggy (from Scooby Doo) because of that fuzzy mound of hair that has congregated on his chin.) 

I am still in a bit of a daze that graduation is upon us. This fall he will be moving out of the house to attend college. And I will be an empty nester. 

A little sadness settles in.

Yet, what seems to be a bit of synchronicity I stumbled upon these words by Kahlil Gibran:

“Your children are not your children.
They are sons and daughters of Life’s longing for itself.
They come through you but not from you.
And though they are with you yet they belong not to you.

You may give them your love but not your thoughts,
For they have their own thoughts.
You may house their bodies but not their souls,
For their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow, which you cannot visit, not even in your dreams.
You may strive to be like them, but seek not to make them like you.
For life goes not backward nor tarries with yesterday.
You are the bows from which your children as living arrows are sent forth.
The archer sees the make upon the path of the infinite, and He bends you with His might that His arrows may go swift and far.
Let your bending in the archer’s hand be for gladness.
For even as He loves the arrow that flies, so He also loves the bow that is stable.

 I needed to read those words.

The words written by Kahlil Gibran helped me as I transition into a new life without Dylan home.

Writing connects you to others and to the world.  And it can help you make sense of your own world and of your life.

It also reminded me how important it is to write to the people in our life. Writing from the heart can bring joy and comfort to you and to others.

That is why I write.  Sharing my words and my feelings has always been important. So instead of making a sandwich for Dylan today, I will write him a graduation note and tell him how I feel about this special day.

 

“Words are, in my not-so-humble opinion, our most inexhaustible source of magic. Capable of both inflicting injury, and remedying it.”    —Albus Dumbledore

Don’t Want Everyone to Read It

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Life is short, art long, opportunity fleeting, experience treacherous, judgement difficult.    

—Hippocrates (460-400 B.C.)

A woman in my class once told me that she was unhappy that her classmates. She said that they did not understand her writing.

“It never happened. It was fiction.  They just don’t get me,” she said.

It reminded me of my own critique classes where I got a whole gamut of different responses to a single piece of writing. Some people said a metaphor was great while others said it was cliche and I could do better.

Who do I believe?

A long time ago I came across some words of advice by a writer. It makes complete sense when dealing with a critique of your writing.

Essentially the writer advised , “don’t want everyone to read it.”

We are all from different backgrounds and have many different life experiences.

We also have different tastes.

What you write will not appeal to everyone. Not everyone who reads your work will understand it, and not everyone will like it.

But that’s OK.

Any comments made constructively and respectfully can be helpful to a writer. In the end, the writer gets to decide what to do with those comments.

It doesn’t mean that you should stop writing or that you are a bad writer.

The most important thing we can do is to be brave enough to write our stories and  to write what’s in our heart. The more we write,  the better we get.  That’s what counts.

Our words will also connect to someone.  But only if we write them.

Always believe that writing matters.

Open Mic Community

 

 

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I hosted an open mic last week for a friend. It was called Chalk Talk Narrative. The theme was family and the art of brevity.

First I read a few of my stories. Then I asked the group to compose their own six-word memoir after reading several examples from the book, Not Quite What I Was Planning: Six-Word Memoirs by Famous & Obscure Writers. Edited by Smith Magazine.

A group of about 10 people sat around a long table Everyone shared their six-word memoir and then read a few pieces of their own writing.

What was special about the evening was not that I was able to read a few of my pieces to an audience but that this small group of people, (some strangers) gathered together for an evening of listening to each other’s words.

A student of mine read a piece he wrote in class about his eyes. Initially he did not think the piece was good enough to read. Yet everyone loved it. His courage to read and the response was what he needed. Without each other, we can be our own harshest critic which can cause us to shut down our words for fear that it is just no good. The Open Mic gives the writer the encouragement to keep writing and that is worth it.

An Open Mic creates community. The people around the table that night were all different ages and from a wide variety of backgrounds, expressing their deepest self, but also willing to pause long enough in their busy lives to listen.

And perhaps make a small difference in one writer’s life.

It doesn’t get much better than that.